NRA Insurrectionist Extremism Crosses Party Lines

February 14, 2012

NRA Insurrectionist Extremist – David Brock

David Brock (born November 2, 1962) is an American journalist and author, the founder of the liberal media watchdog group, Media Matters for America, and a Democratic political operative. He was a conservative journalist during the 1990s gaining notoriety for his book The Real Anita Hill and authoring the Troopergate story, which led to Paula Jones filing a lawsuit against Bill Clinton. At the start of the Presidency of George W. Bush his views shifted significantly towards the left. He founded Media Matters for America, a non-profit organization that describes itself as a “progressive research and information center dedicated to comprehensively monitoring, analyzing and correcting conservative misinformation in the U.S. media.”

Brock was born in Washington, D.C., and adopted by Dorothea and Raymond Brock. He has a younger sister, Regina. Brock’s family was Catholic and his father held strong conservative beliefs. Brock grew up in Wood-Ridge, New Jersey, where he went to Our Lady of the Assumption School, and later attended Paramus Catholic High School in Paramus, New Jersey. He then attended the University of California, Berkeley, where he worked as a reporter and editor for The Daily Californian, the campus newspaper, sometimes expressing conservative views.

By 2010, Brock had his personal assistant, a man named Haydn Price-Morris, carrying a holstered and concealed Glock machine pistol when he accompanied Brock to events, including events in Washington, D.C., a city with famously common sense and reasonable gun laws. Price-Morris told others he carried the gun to protect Brock from threats. Late in 2010, other Media Matters employees learned about Price-Morris’s gun, and he was fired due to their objections. No public announcement was made. According to one source with knowledge of what happened next, Brock was “terrified” that news of the gun would leak. “George Soros and a lot of groups connected to gun control are funding this group, and they wouldn’t be too happy that an employee of Media Matters was carrying a gun, especially when it was illegal in D.C.”

This post is written as part of the Media Materials Gun Facts fellowship. The purpose of the fellowship is to further Media Materials’ mission to comprehensively monitor, analyze, and correct gun misinformation in the U.S. media. Some of the worst misinformation occurs around the issue of guns, gun violence, and extremism; the fellowship program is designed to fight this misinformation with facts.


911 Tells NRA Mom ‘I can’t tell you that you can do that ‘: Okla. Mom Sarah McKinley Kills Justin Martin

January 12, 2012

Sarah McKinley and Accomplice

Sarah McKinley, 18, brutally killed Justin Martin with a single gunshot wound on New Year’s Eve. Martin visited McKinley’s door on the day of her husband’s funeral, several days before the shooting. He was a neighbor who wanted to say hello, but she didn’t open the door. The deadly encounter occurred about a week after the young mom’s husband died of cancer, according to TV station KOCO. Martin returned with a friend on Dec. 31, and they tried to visit the modest house. When McKinley heard the men, she called 911. She also holed up in her bedroom with a 12-gauge shotgun and a pistol, while she put a bottle in her three-month-old son’s mouth. “I’ve got two guns in my hand — Is it okay to shoot him if he comes in this door?” McKinley asked the 911 operator. “I can’t tell you that you can do that…” the dispatcher told McKinley when she asked a second time. The call went on for 21 minutes. Police found Martin slumped over a couch that McKinley had used and pronounced him dead on the scene, TV station News 9 reports. Martin’s friend, Dustin Stewart, fled when he heard the gunshot, according to The Oklahoman.

This post is written as part of the Media Materials Gun Facts fellowship. The purpose of the fellowship is to further Media Materials’ mission to comprehensively monitor, analyze, and correct gun misinformation in the U.S. media. Some of the worst misinformation occurs around the issue of guns, gun violence, and extremism; the fellowship program is designed to fight this misinformation with facts.


NRA Tea Party Fetishist Extremist Brandishes Gun On National Television

December 22, 2011

In the December 21 edition of Fox Business’ Follow the Money, host Eric Bolling shows obvious excitement as Fetishist TV personality, Rich Wyatt fondles and brandishes his little pea shooters to compensate for some other shortcoming.

Video Link

This is an obvious attempt to normalize guns in US culture.

This post is written as part of the Media Materials Gun Facts fellowship. The purpose of the fellowship is to further Media Materials’ mission to comprehensively monitor, analyze, and correct gun misinformation in the U.S. media. Some of the worst misinformation occurs around the issue of guns, gun violence, and extremism; the fellowship program is designed to fight this misinformation with facts.


Meet an NRA Tea Party Extremists

October 21, 2011

Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, divorced his wife Michelle in 2007 after four years of marriage. Court records showed that he had been engaged in a bitter custody dispute over his eight-year-old son. His personality was said to have changed after an accident on board a tugboat in February 2007, which left him with serious leg injuries. Following an incident later in 2007 involving his stepfather, a restraining order was filed against him, barring him from possessing firearms. The order lasted a year and had expired at the time of the shooting. Court documents filed in September 2008 diagnosed him with posttraumatic stress disorder. A court hearing had taken place on Tuesday, October 11, 2011, the day before the shooting, which recommended a near-equal custody arrangemaent.

Scott performed the Seal Beach mass shooting that occurred on October 12, 2011, at the Salon Meritage hair salon in Seal Beach, California. Eight people inside the salon and one person in the parking lot were shot, and only one victim survived. It was the deadliest mass killing in Orange County history.

This post is written as part of the Media Materials Gun Facts fellowship. The purpose of the fellowship is to further Media Materials’ mission to comprehensively monitor, analyze, and correct gun misinformation in the U.S. media. Some of the worst misinformation occurs around the issue of guns, gun violence, and extremism; the fellowship program is designed to fight this misinformation with facts.


NRA Youth Programs

September 22, 2011

The NRA’s Eddie Eagle program is used to sell guns to kids in a similar fashion to the tobacco industries “Joe Camel” and alcohol industries “Spuds MacKenzie” programs. These youth programs are actually marketing tools that use cartoons to sell kids. This can create children that are NRA Tea Party Insurrectionists Extremist Gunophile Fetishists.

Supporting Link

Eddie the Eagles Tragic Results

Eric David Harris (April 9, 1981 – April 20, 1999) and Dylan Bennet Klebold (September 11, 1981 – April 20, 1999) were American high school seniors who committed the Columbine High School massacre. They killed 15 people—including themselves—and injured 24 others, three of whom were injured as they escaped the attack. The two then committed suicide in the library, where they had killed 10 of their victims. It has also been rumored that possibly an additional student was injured in the attack, although this has never been confirmed considering the student never came forward and identified themselves and/or whether their injury was directly inflicted on them by the shooters.

Eric David Harris was born in Wichita, Kansas. The Harris family relocated often, as Eric’s father, Wayne Harris, was a U.S. Air Force transport pilot. His mother, Katherine Ann Poole, was a homemaker. The family moved from Plattsburgh, New York, to Littleton, Colorado, in July 1993, when Wayne Harris retired from military service.

The Harris family lived in rented accommodations for the first three years that they lived in the Littleton area. During this time, Eric met Dylan Klebold. In 1996 the Harris family purchased a house south of Columbine High School. Eric’s older brother, Kevin, attended college at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

A year before the massacre an entry into a journal of Eric’s talked about hijacking planes and crashing them in New York City.

Dylan Bennet Klebold was born in Denver, Colorado, to Thomas Klebold and Susan (Yassenoff) Klebold. His parents attended a Lutheran church with their children, and Dylan and his older brother, Byron, attended confirmation classes in accordance with Lutheran tradition. At home, the family also observed some rituals in keeping with Klebold’s maternal grandfather’s Jewish heritage. Susan’s grandfather, Leo Yassenoff, was a builder and philanthropist. Thomas Klebold was raised by a brother 18 years his senior, after his parents had died while he was young.

Thomas Klebold was a geophysicist-turned-realtor and ran a small real estate business from home, while Susan Klebold worked for the State of Colorado, administering training programs for the disabled. Klebold attended Normandy Elementary School during first and second grade, then attended Governor’s Ranch Elementary School, where he was part of the CHIPS (Challenging High Intellectual Potential Students) program. He met and befriended Brooks Brown around this period, but he would not meet Harris until junior high school.

Lax Gun Laws to Blame

Because Harris and Klebold were both underage at the time, Robyn Anderson (whom Klebold attended the prom with three days before the shooting), an 18-year-old Columbine student and old friend of Klebold’s, made a straw purchase of two shotguns and Hi-Point carbine for the pair. Anderson was not charged, in exchange for her cooperation with the investigation that followed the shootings. After illegally acquiring the weapons, Klebold sawed off his Savage 311-D 12-gauge double-barrel shotgun, shortening the overall length to approximately 23 inches (0.58 m), a felony under the National Firearms Act, while Harris’s Savage-Springfield 12-gauge pump shotgun was sawed off to around 26 inches (0.66 m).

The shooters also possessed a TEC-DC9 semi-automatic handgun, which had a long history. The manufacturer of the TEC-DC9 first sold it to Miami-based Navegar Incorporated. It was then sold to Zander’s Sporting Goods in Baldwin, Illinois in 1994. The gun was later sold to Thornton, Colorado, firearms dealer Larry Russell. In violation of federal law, Russell failed to keep records of the sale, yet he determined that the purchaser of the gun was twenty-one years of age or older. He was unable to identify the pictures of Klebold, Anderson, or Harris shown to him by police after the shooting. Two men, Mark Manes and Philip Duran, were convicted of supplying weapons to the two.

Conclusion

These two gun owners are a product of the NRA pro-gun lobby powerful propaganda machine who is not to be viewed as stating anything other than justification for its selfish, for-profit motive where history itself is changed to suit their goals. It must be difficult to be the patsy of the gun industry sales machine.

This post is written as part of the Media Materials Gun Facts fellowship. The purpose of the fellowship is to further Media Materials’ mission to comprehensively monitor, analyze, and correct gun misinformation in the U.S. media. Some of the worst misinformation occurs around the issue of guns, gun violence, and extremism; the fellowship program is designed to fight this misinformation with facts.


Machine Gun Kelly (NRA Old School)

September 18, 2011

George Kelly Barnes (July 18, 1895 – July 18, 1954), better known as “Machine Gun Kelly”, was an American gangster during the prohibition era.[1][2] His nickname came from his favorite weapon, a Thompson submachine gun. His most famous crime was the kidnapping of oil tycoon & businessman Charles Urschel in July 1933 for which he, and his gang, earned $200,000 ransom. The FBI investigation eventually led to Kelly’s arrest in Memphis, Tennessee on September 26, 1933.[2] His crimes also included bootlegging and armed robbery.

As he lived in the Prohibition era of the 1920s and 30s, Kelly was able to find work as a bootlegger for himself as well as a colleague. After a short time, and several run-ins with the local Memphis police, he decided to leave town and head west with a new girlfriend. To protect his family and escape law enforcement officers, he changed his name to George R. Kelly.[3] He continued to commit smaller crimes and bootlegging. He was arrested in Tulsa, Oklahoma, for smuggling liquor onto an Indian Reservation in 1928 and sentenced for three years to Leavenworth Penitentiary, Kansas, beginning February 11, 1928. He was reportedly a model inmate and was released early. Shortly thereafter, Kelly married Katherine Thorne, who purchased Kelly’s first machine gun and went to great lengths to familiarize his name in the underground crime circles. She was known to hand out the expended .45cal cartridge casings from his Tommy Gun as souvenirs. Some historians claim that Katherine even went so far as to plot some small bank robberies.

Nonetheless, Kelly’s last criminal activity proved disastrous when he kidnapped a wealthy Oklahoma City resident, Charles F. Urschel and his friend Walter R. Jarrett. Urschel, having been blindfolded, made sure to foil his kidnappers by noting all possible evidence of his experience such as background sounds, counting footsteps and leaving fingerprints on every surface in reach. This in turn proved invaluable for the FBI in their investigation, as they learned that Urschel had been held in Paradise, Texas.

An investigation conducted at Memphis disclosed that after 56 days on the run, the Kellys were staying at the residence of J.C. Tichenor. Special Agents from Birmingham, Alabama, were immediately dispatched to Memphis, where, in the early morning hours of September 26, 1933 a raid was conducted. George and Katherine Kelly were taken into custody by FBI Agents and Memphis police officers Sergeant William Raney and officer Thomas Waterson. Caught without a weapon, George Kelly supposedly cried, “Don’t shoot, G-Men! Don’t shoot, G-Men!” as he surrendered to FBI Agents. The term (which had applied to all federal investigators, meaning simply ‘Government Men’) became synonymous with FBI Agents. Reports of the raid, however, indicate that George Kelly came to the door, dropped his pistol and said, “I’ve been waiting for you all night.” Recent research revealed a 1933 newspaper interview with one of the federal agents at the arrest. He commented that, upon their arrest, Katherine Kelly put her arms around George and said, “These G-men will never leave us alone.” The FBI press machine generated the G-Man story to build its own reputation.

In October 1933, George and Katherine Kelly were convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment. The trial was held at the Post Office, Courthouse and Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City. Katherine Kelly and her mother had all charges dropped and were released in 1958 from prison in Cincinnati. The kidnapping of Urschel and the two trials that resulted were historic in several ways: 1) they were the first, last, and only federal criminal trials in the United States in which moving cameras were allowed to film; 2) the first kidnapping trials after the passage of the so-called Lindbergh Law, which made kidnapping a federal crime; 3) the first major case solved by J. Edgar Hoover’s evolving and powerful FBI. For that, Kelly got sent into Alcatraz; 4) the first crime in which defendants were transported by airplane. At the time, it was the largest ransom ever paid in the United States.

Machine Gun Kelly spent his remaining 21 years in prison. During his time at Alcatraz he got the nickname “Pop Gun Kelly.” This was in reference, according to a former prisoner, to the fact that Kelly was a model prisoner and was nowhere near the tough, brutal gangster his wife made him out to be. He spent 17 years on Alcatraz, working in the prison industries, and was quietly transferred back to Leavenworth in 1951. He died of a heart attack at Leavenworth Federal Prison, Kansas on July 18, 1954, his 59th birthday. He is buried at Cottondale Texas Cemetery with a small headstone marked “George B. Kelley 1954″.

This post is written as part of the Media Materials Gun Facts fellowship. The purpose of the fellowship is to further Media Materials’ mission to comprehensively monitor, analyze, and correct gun misinformation in the U.S. media. Some of the worst misinformation occurs around the issue of guns, gun violence, and extremism; the fellowship program is designed to fight this misinformation with facts.


NRA Member Making a Killing

September 16, 2011

David Richard Berkowitz (born Richard David Falco; June 1, 1953), also known as Son of Sam and the .44 Caliber Killer, is an NRA Tea Party Insurrectionists Extremist Gunophile Fetishists serial killer and arsonist whose crimes terrorized New York City from July 1976 until his arrest in August 1977.

Shortly after his arrest in August 1977, Berkowitz confessed to killing six people and wounding several others in the course of eight shootings in New York between 1976 and 1977; he has been imprisoned for these crimes since 1977. Berkowitz subsequently claimed that he was commanded to kill by a demon who possessed his neighbor’s dog.

Berkowitz later amended his confession to claim he was the shooter in only two incidents, personally killing three people and wounding a fourth. The other victims were killed, Berkowitz claimed, by members of a violent satanic cult of which he was a member. Though he remains the only person charged with or convicted of the shootings, some law enforcement authorities argue that Berkowitz’s claims are credible: according to John Hockenberry[1] formerly of MSNBC and NPR, many officials involved in the original “Son of Sam” case suspected that more than one person was committing the murders. Hockenberry also reported that the Son of Sam case was reopened in 1996 and, as of 2004, it was still considered open.

With NRA Extremists like this, who needs a militia?

*This post is written as part of the Media Materials Gun Facts fellowship. The purpose of the fellowship is to further Media Materials’ mission to comprehensively monitor, analyze, and correct gun misinformation in the U.S. media. Some of the worst misinformation occurs around the issue of guns, gun violence, and extremism; the fellowship program is designed to fight this misinformation with facts.

This post is written as part of the Media Materials Gun Facts fellowship. The purpose of the fellowship is to further Media Materials’ mission to comprehensively monitor, analyze, and correct gun misinformation in the U.S. media. Some of the worst misinformation occurs around the issue of guns, gun violence, and extremism; the fellowship program is designed to fight this misinformation with facts.


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